Reporters banned from Olympic site

Sunday, February 7, 2010

In Vancouver Canada the Olympic officials have banned news reporters from the site where freestyle and snowboarding events are to take place. The site has been plagued by a lack of snow. Therefore the officials closed the site to the media and the public as helicopters and 300 lorries were used to bring snow down to the site from higher altitudes. Vanoc vice-president Tim Gayda assures the community that there is nothing to hide as he is thinking of safety first.



As far as a ban on the public that is understandable but the media should be able to view the ferrying of snow down to the site. If there is nothing to hide then why not let some of the reporters or just camera men in. Of course since it's in Canada the laws may be a little different for this sort of thing. However a complete ban just does not make much sense. This is the Olympics, the news coverage is crazy so to hear that the media has been banned from an area is really hard to fully comprehend, and of course, the reporters who are there are not too happy.

2 comments:

Coetsee February 7, 2010 at 10:52 PM  

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Tyler Lloyd February 9, 2010 at 11:01 AM  

I think the deal is that it is hard enough preparing for your country to hold a national event and because of this you don't need annoying reporters sneaking around blowing things out of proportion. If there is one thing the media is good at it is making mountains out of mole hills and I can understand why you wouldn't want the twerps around while preparing for the biggest sporting event your country may hold.

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